‘Errin Stevens’

up- eirrinToday, I’d like to welcome For Errin Stevens, author of “Updrift” to The Thursday Interview. Before we get started, a quick intro!

Errin Stevens writes paranormal fiction and reads practically everything she can get her hands on. Errin Stevens writes from her home in St. Paul, Minnesota, where she lives with her husband and son. When not wrestling with unruly narrative – or reading everything from mythology to contemporary romance to New Adult suspense – you’ll find her swooning over seed catalogs (winter), or digging in the garden (the other three days of the year).

OK – HERE WE GO !!

 

No.1: Would you break the law to save a loved one? Yes. If I had to steal to feed or protect my family, I wouldn’t hesitate. If they were in danger and there was no other way, yes, I would. I love my family and especially if my family were in danger, watch out!

No.2: What is the difference between being alive and truly living? I believe we are put on this earth to be both express ourselves as individuals and serve as supportive members of our broader human community. When we lose focus on one purpose at the expense of another, I think everyone suffers. The feeling of suffering, moreover, should motivate us to look at what we need to do to stay vital and grow.

No.3: What motivates you to write? I read so much and so hard as a kid I remember a huge swath of memories in the wrong order… and subsequently hardwired a narrative filter into my brain which every experience I have goes through. I’m constantly deciding how I would characterize in words what happens around me.

No.4: Why do humans want children? Well. Isn’t that a question for the ages? I have dear friends who don’t… but most people, myself included, do. We have one child and will stop there for quality of life reasons as well as other more practical issues. This question harkens to question #2 above, I think, i.e., depending on your own unique nature, you will procreate or not according to how you fit into the world, which your own suffering will guide you to experience. I very much needed to be a mother, went through quite the process to become one, and am very glad I am. I’m also very glad I have only one!

No.5: What was the biggest challenge in creating your book, ”Updrift”? Everything was a big challenge for me, starting with giving myself permission to write it! I would think, ‘How dare I?’ Then after I dared, there were a few years of wandering in the cesspool of sharing and critiques, which was a crapshoot to be honest but ultimately REALLY helped me hone my prose. The last big challenge for me was rewriting the work from omniscient voice to third person to adhere to the editorial standards of my publisher at the time.

No.6: What is the most important thing you have learned in life so far? Hmmm…that’s a hard question. Because, even as you get older, you still keep learning. Two things, the second more important than the first… and I’ll warn you right now I’m going to sound trite! Be grateful, and love one another.

No.7: How did you come up with the title “Updrift”? Funny you ask this, since I thought hard on my initial titles, which were Blue, Sapphire, and Cobalt. After attending a writer’s conference in New York a few years ago, though, I realized I needed to go for a different connotation, one that wasn’t so flatly visual. I researched oceanic terms and played with them until I settled on Updrift, Breakwater, and Outrush. I prefer them because they’re fresher and have more dimension.

No.8: How do you handle personal criticism? Nobody likes to hear criticism. At least I don’t think so. Depends on who’s handing out the criticism! Criticism really did get my work where it needed to be, but not everyone is a capable critic, which can be hard to figure out when you first start writing. I wrote a humorous piece on this a while back if you’re interested.

No.9: Why should people read your book? People should go to my stories for the imaginary escape, and also to feel “fed” in the reading of them. This is my hope in going through all of this, that you will walk away feeling loved and bolstered by the more generous intimacies that go with being human.

No.10: Why is there something rather than nothing? Again, a question for the ages, and I very much wonder what compelled you to ask these questions! This is too light an answer, but what we see and feel as individuals defines much of what we think of as reality, and it is our own unique personhood that launches the explorations of art, literature, science – everything we can think up in this world. The “something” comes forth when we bring our efforts out of ourselves and share it with others.

Thank you 🙂 For taking the time to answer
my questions & the best of luck with your new book:

Updrift

Since her father died, Kate Sweeting’s home life has been in the pits, her well-being on life support. Her future looks desolate until she and her mother, Cara, make another plan: abandon their shriveled existence for more promising prospects on the coast, where Cara can play small-town librarian-bachelorette and Kate can figure out what’s up with that secretive Blake family from the beach.

Everyone is eerily captivated with Kate and her mother, and Cara is the first to figure out why when the man of her dreams arrives all dripping and devoted and closed-mouthed about what he intends. Kate is willing to go along with their subterfuge for a while, but eventually makes a charge for the water to learn what her mother is hiding. Gabe Blake is there waiting for her…and so is someone considerably less friendly. By the time Kate navigates her way home, everything will have changed for her—what she feels, what she wants, and what she’ll risk to be with the man she loves.

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